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Zong-Ming Cheng

Zong-Ming Cheng

PHD, Editor-in-Chief of Horticulture Research/Plant Phenomics, Nanjing Agricultural University/University of Tennessee
Dr. Cheng received his BS in Fruit Science from Nanjing Agricultural University in 1982 and his MS (in 1988) and Ph.D (in 1991) from Cornell University in Ithaca, NY, USA. For over the last 20 years, Dr. Cheng has been working on genetics, breeding, biotechnology and genomics of fruits, ornamental and forest trees at North Dakota State University (from November 1990 to July 2001), at University of Tennessee (August 2001 to now), and jointly at Nanjing Agricultural University (September 2009 to now). Dr. Cheng has (co)authored about 70 refereed publications and his research has been funded by USDA, DOE/CPBR, EPA/CPBR, NSF and other public and industry supports. Dr. Cheng currently serves as Associate Editors, Consult Editor, and Guest Editor-in-Chief for several professional journals. Dr. Cheng was elected Fellow of American Society for Horticultural Sciences in 2012.

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On-Demand Presentations

The Changing Academic Publishing Landscape in China

01:09:33

Release Date: 08/24/2020, Zong-Ming Cheng, Tao Tao, Donna Minton, Ph.D., Lori Carlin

For nearly two decades, international publishers have seen tremendous output from China provide mainly positive impact on their publishing programs. They’ve experienced growth from subscriptions to submissions to accepted papers, with little end in sight…or is there? China may now believe it is time to “build its own ship and sail independently,"" developing their own international academic publishing market. Recent activities and reports certainly indicate that China is looking to expand their scholarly publishing efforts, trying new approaches and providing funding to support experimentation. Now, an unprecedented large-scale national plan (including the “Action Plan for the Excellence of Chinese STM Journals”) includes specific directives to encourage internal, domestic collaboration and expansion. What if these efforts lead China to turn their publishing output inward? In this session, experts with local experience in China will provide first-hand insights into the most recent Chinese directives and developments that have the potential to disrupt the academic publishing industry in China. We will hear directly from those experimenting with new and novel approaches to publishing research in China, along with what Chinese researchers are saying today about publishing, open access, how they make submission decisions, and what publishers need to know about the new and emerging opportunities and challenges in China.